A virus is spreading like a virus.

After receiving about a week’s notice regarding the incoming carpet-pesticiding to kill mosquitoes that may be carrying the West Nile Virus, the Sacramento Bee finally – a day after the first air raid to end all air raids – brought out the in-depth coverage. Sure, they announced/warned the people living in Northern Sacramento County in a little article the day before, but not every one reads the paper every day, and not every one watches the news every day. It’s a little annoying that they decided to actually start covering the story – presenting depth to both the pros and the cons – after there was absolutely nothing that could be done (save suing at a later date).
I feel bad for my sister, who started freaking out last night after reading about it and realizing she might have been outside during the four hour window. And I feel bad for the organic farmers who probably can’t refer to their crops as organic anymore, as they’ve now been sprayed by pesticides. And I feel bad for all the kids who are stuck inside on a warm summer’s eve, pressed against the sliding glass window that broke their sister’s nose a few years ago, pining to just run outside to be free to lick all their yard toys – as any kid would.
Now, I’m not one to question the germ engineers, what with their omnipresent gaze and gallons of pyrethrum at their disposal, but I wonder at the precision of a spray that can “be applied in miniscule droplets that should dissipate before touching the ground, but not before wiping out the mosquitoes” but also relies on “killing a mosquito on contact (but not a larger insect)” (Sac Bee, Aug. 9, 2005). I mean, mosquitoes fly about four feet above the ground – so that’s some precise dissipation. I guess I’m questioning what they mean by dissipation. I won’t go into further detail, as I’m tired of saying that word in my head.
When I was a youngster, living in the Hancock Park neighborhood in Los Angeles, there were some bugs that lived in trees, and they were taking over the entire city. The city, in return, proposed to aerial spray the city and kill them all. Citizens of Hancock Park, and neighboring Beverly Hills, were not so down with that, and they voiced their opinions and shoved a bunch of money down the right people’s pockets. This grassroots campaign for justice was successful. In the end, all the poor people got bombed. My neighborhood remained fresh and lickable.
On that note:

This just in, Bronx to Get Spray-Bombed After Residents In Manhattan Come Down With Virus
I don’t want my brain to rot just as much as the next gal (and some guys), but is this really the best way to go about killing mosquitoes? Would it have really hurt so much to spend another week discussing the issue and becoming more aware of how to personally battle mosquitoes. And can’t they just dunk a bunch of dunks all over the place instead? I mean, that would make for better headlines.

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